Vying for a Sopt of Alignment

Three celestial bodies vie for a spot of alignment! In preparation, here’s my take on totality!

Less than 16 hours for the first ‘Totality’ to appear in Oregon. The last time a total solar eclipse was visible from coast to coast in the United States was in 1918. Total solar eclipse was when some of the most fundamental discoveries in science were made – like the first proof of Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity, the discovery of the element Helium and solar storms or Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) to name a few! And now a chance for new discoveries, new information, new research into the sun and its atmosphere, and of course a great show put on for everyone in it’s path! I’m ready…
#totality #totalsolareclipse2017 #totaleclipseoftheheart

Andrew Wyeth: In Retrospect

An Exhibit at the Brandywine River Museum celebrating the 100th anniversary of the artist’s birth

I spent all day today at the Brandywine River museum at the ‘Andrew Wyeth: In Retrospect’ exhibit. I’d been looking forward to this since it’s announcement, and today was the day, on the 100th anniversary of Andrew Wyeth’s birth!

The museum had organized special events for the day, including the dedication of 12 Andrew Wyeth Forever® Stamps by the United States Postal Service, a tour of his studio, and watercolor demos by local artists.

I envisioned that an exhibit of this caliber would bring together many of Wyeth’s rarely seen works and I was anticipating his watercolors, especially the ones from his early period, and it did not disappoint. Kudos to the curators Audrey Lewis (Curator, Brandywine River Museum of Art) and Patricia Junker (the Ann M. Barwick Curator of American Art at the Seattle Art Museum), for a fabulous output.

The exhibit spanning two floors of the museum is presented chronologically and spans Wyeth’s work from his very early stages, as early as his twenties, all the way through to his last painting titled ‘Goodbye’ which he completed just prior to his death.

This is just a teaser of a few of his watercolors!

I ended the day with a preview of the WYETH documentary feature film, that presents, through his paintings, his life story and his emotions and the driving force that led him to paint objects, landscapes and people in just the two locales where he spent most of his life – Chadds Ford and Maine. The documentary attempts to reveal through his paintings for the first time, what lies beneath the Wyeth that the world thought they knew. It talks about his journey to reduce his subject to its bare essentials using objects and landscapes to evoke emotions and represent people of importance in his life. The documentary is set to premier on PBS series American Master sometime in spring / Fall of 2018.

The exhibit leaves you breathless. It’s worth seeing more than once and I expect to do so. It’s on view here in Chadds Ford through September 17, and then it will go on to be  presented at the Seattle Art Museum beginning in October 2017.

If you get a chance, this is a must see exhibit of Chadds Ford’s most iconic resident artist.

Fireworks on the National Mall 

Day 5/31 – #WorldWatecolorMonth

DC put on a spectacular show at the National Mall last night. Fear of thunderstorms had the fate of the fireworks in doubt, but we lucked out and the storm and rain held out long enough for the eager crowds to get what they came for and then some! I managed to capture a few splashes of watercolor in my sketchbook in semi darkness. I did several of these and then I just had to put down my brush and simply watch, and oooh and aaah with the rest of the crowd! This one came out better than the rest so I refined it a bit. 

I might just post the other splashes, if I feel bold enough…

“What does Blue mean?” Panel Discussion at the Getty 

If you’re in LA this week be sure to check out the Panel Discussion on “What Does Blue Mean?” At the GETTY CENTER, Thursday, June 8, 2017, at 7 pm, Harold M. Williams Auditorium. 

Free | Advance ticket required. 

Panelists include Prof Mas Subramanian, inventor of YInMnBlue, authors Catherine McKinley and Carol Mavor, and actor/comedian/singer Garrett Morris. ‘Blue describes emotional states, musical and literary genres, and moral codes. And yet, historically, humans have found the color itself notably difficult to pin down. How did blue come to occupy its singular scientific and cultural significance? What relationships exist between the history of blue pigments and the wealth of meanings the term conveys today?’ Come explore the science and sentiment of the color Blue. 

http://www.getty.edu/visit/cal/events/ev_1748.html

 (Image courtesy Getty Museum – Uvena Novae Villiae, about 1854, Anna Atkins and Anne Dixon. Cyanotype. The J. Paul Getty Museum)